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Nutrients for Stress-Damaged Hair, Skin and Nails-love-your-skin

Nutrients for Stress-Damaged Hair, Skin and Nails

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July 14, 2016 | Published by


Stress rapidly burns up nutrients that can profoundly affect hair, skin and nails – the fastest growing visible tissues. The typical diet often does not provide ideal amounts of all the nutrients necessary for healthy tissue production, especially with stressful lifestyles. In addition, it takes more than the right nutrients to produce hair, skin and nails that look their best during stressful times; it takes specific nutrients combined in precise proportions and delivered in their most bioavailable forms.*

Vitamin A

Vitamin A can help enhance the growth rate and density of hair. This vitamin is also vital to the development and maintenance of epithelial tissues, which line the cavities and surfaces of blood vessels and organs throughout the body. Another benefit is its important role in regulating the keratinization of the epidermis, a process that forms nails and makes skin more resilient.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is needed to form collagen, the principal structural component of the skin. Its quantity and quality has a major effect on the skin’s health and appearance. Vitamin C has shown to be an effective antioxidant, so it can help protect against damage to your hair, skin and nails by free radicals.

Riboflavin (B2), Niacin (B3), Vitamin B6, Folate (B9)

Riboflavin is essential for maintaining collagen content and skin integrity. In fact, the B-complex vitamins are needed for a healthy liver, healthy skin, hair, and eyes, and to help the nervous system function properly.

Biotin

Biotin has shown to increase nail plate thickness and help strengthen brittle nails.

Calcium

Calcium plays a key role in signaling the viable epidermis beneath skin with damaged permeability barrier to initiate restoration.

Iron

Silicon, iron and vitamin C are needed for synthesis of proline and hydroxyproline, which are important to collagen’s primary structure. Silicon is also required for the synthesis of polysaccharides important to skin health.

Magnesium

Every organ in the body, your skin included, needs magnesium.

Zinc

Zinc is important to skin integrity, as well as cell growth and replication.

Manganese

Manganese superoxide dismutase reduces superoxide levels, which helps counter oxidative damage in the skin from UVA radiation.

Golden Flax

Ingestion of flax seed for 12 weeks demonstrated to favorably modify skin reddening in response to irritation, enhance transepidermal water retention, and decrease roughness and scaling of the skin.

PABA

Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) is a chemical found in folic acid. PABA is used as a sunscreen because of its abilities to help protect the skin from UV rays.

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References:

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