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Nutrients Vital to Tissue Health and Injury Recovery

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February 19, 2020 | Published by


A stressful life can be hard on your hair, skin and nails, but also on healing speed after an injury. During stress, your body’s survival priority is to prepare you to physically respond to the stressor (the “fight or flight response”). This means growth, maintenance and repair of tissues gets temporarily downgraded to a lower priority.2

Today we’re taking a look at some nutrients that are crucial for tissue health.

Manganese

Manganese is a trace mineral found in tiny amounts in our bodies. Mostly found in bones, kidneys, the liver, and pancreas, manganese is responsible for helping the body form connective tissues, bones, sex hormones, and blood clotting factors. Manganese also assists in carbohydrate and fat metabolism, blood sugar regulation, and calcium absorption.1

Use in the Body

Emerging evidence among the scientific community recognizes the important function silicon plays in both bone formation as well as maintenance. Boosting silicon intake has been linked with increased bone mineral density as well as bone strength.12

Food sources1

  •  Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Wheat germ (oats, buckwheat, bulgur wheat, unrefined cereals)
  • Legumes
  • Pineapples

Vitamin C

Vitamin C, as it occurs in nature, always appears as a composite of ascorbic acid and certain bioflavonoids. It is this vitamin C complex that is so beneficial, not just ascorbic acid, by itself. Bioflavonoids are essential if ascorbic acid is to be fully metabolized and utilized by your body.6

Use in the Body

Vitamin C is needed to form collagen, the principal structural component of the skin. Its quantity and quality have a major effect on the skin’s health and appearance. Vitamin C has shown to be an effective antioxidant, so it can help protect against damage by free radicals to your hair, skin and nails.5

Food sources4

  • Kakadu plums
  • Acerola cherries
  • Rose hips
  • Chili peppers
  • Guavas
  • Sweet yellow peppers
  • Thyme
  • Kale
  • Broccoli

Zinc

Zinc is an essential trace mineral and is the second most common mineral in the body (next to iron). This mineral is found in every cell in the body. Zinc has been used for centuries to assist in wound healing, and plays a vital role in the immune system, growth, sense of taste, vision, and reproduction.8

Use in the Body

Zinc is responsible for maintaining skin integrity as well as structure. Zinc-deficient individuals display lower serum zinc levels and are often have deficient zinc metabolism, leading them to suffer from chronic wounds and ulcers.7

Food Sources

  • Shellfish (oysters, crab, lobster)
  • Beef
  • Poultry
  • Pork
  • Legumes
  • Nuts, seeds
  • Whole grains
  • Fortified breakfast cereals

Silicon (Silica)

Silicon is a naturally occurring mineral that exists within the earth as well as our bodies. It’s also vital for the diet since it increases the benefits of calcium, vitamin D, and glucosamine.10

Use in the Body

In addition to being beneficial for nail, skin, and hair care, there are many health benefits associated with silicon, including its ability to strengthen connective tissues as well as bones.10

Food sources10

  • Leafy green vegetables
  • Beets
  • Bell peppers
  • Brown rice
  • Oats
  • Alfalfa

It is important to make sure you’re eating a balanced diet with plenty of vitamins and minerals in order to avoid developing deficiencies. In addition to eating foods containing adequate amounts of protein, calories, and nutrients, it can, in many cases, be beneficial to supplement additional resources (especially for those dealing with any adrenal insufficiencies).

Dr. Wilson’s Hair, Skin & Nails Plus Formula® and Dr. Wilson’s Adrenal C Formula® were both formulated with tissue and injury recovery in mind, and contain all the ingredients listed above.*

References:

  1.  Mount Sinai. https://www.mountsinai.org/health-library/supplement/manganese
  2. Stress and Tissue Health: A Hard Knock Life. Adrenalfatigue.org https://adrenalfatigue.org/stress-and-tissue-health-hard-knock-life/
  3. Harvard T.H. Chan. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/zinc/
  4. Hill, Caroline. 20 Foods That Are High in Vitamin C. Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-c-foods
  5. Nutrients for Stress-Damaged Hair, Skin and Nails. Adrenalfatigue.org. https://adrenalfatigue.org/nutrients-stress-damaged-hair-skin-nails/
  6. Wilsons, J. Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome
  7. Nordqvist, J. What are the health benefits of zinc? Medical News Today. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263176
  8. Mount Sinai. https://www.mountsinai.org/health-library/supplement/zinc
  9. Wilson, D. Is Silicon Dioxide Safe? Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/is-silicon-dioxide-in-supplements-safe#in-food-and-supplements
  10. Nagdeve , M. 9 Amazing Benefits Of Silicon. Organic Facts. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/minerals/health-benefits-of-silicon.html
  11. Goodson, A. 10 Evidence-Based Benefits of Manganese. Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/manganese-benefits

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